February 19, 2020

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It has been quite an interesting process in recent weeks as a set of individual experts in the music field analyse the tracks competing in the first semi-final of the Eurovision Song Contest which is set to take place in Baku, Azerbaijan for the very first time following the victory of Ell & Nikki with the song Running Scared. Many people view the number #13 as a superstitious digit and therefore, some countries might be very disapproving of their running order but nevertheless, the position has been taken up by one of the leading contenders for qualification and that is none other than Soluna Samay who will be representing Denmark with the song 'Should've Known Better' which won the Dansk Melodi Grand Prix earlier this year despite the tough competition that it had to face. The track has been written by Chief 1, Remee & Isam B who already have a host of hits to their name. 

Remée and Chief 1 first discovered Soluna Samay through the social medias when they were looking for a solo singer to perform their wild card entry at the Danish Melodi Grand Prix 2012. On the other hand they could easily have met Soluna on the street, where she often performs as a busker, both in Copenhagen and in other big cities around Europe. The 21-year-old singer/song writer has been doing this throughout her whole life, visiting many of the world’s continents, performing and singing her songs. 

Soluna Samay started singing in the streets at the age of 6, helping her father out, making a living as he performed in streets and alleys all over the world. Her father taught her how to play the drums, the double bass and the guitar, and before the age of 10 Soluna was writing her first songs. Since then she has played, both on her own and together with her father, earning a living every summer. When the Danes first met Soluna, it was on TV for the Danish Melodi Grand Prix, and immediately she stole their hearts. She won the votes of the Danish fans, and thereby also the honour of representing Denmark at this year’s Eurovision Song Contest in Baku. When she was initially contacted by Chief 1 in December, and heard the song, she had never imagined she would be getting this experience. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Z2w8Ocka2c

Soluna Samay was born and raised in Guatemala, by her German father and her Swiss-German mother. At the age of 10 the family moved to Denmark, settling down on the small island of Bornholm. As many others before them, they fell in love with Denmark, and bought a small country house which they renovated. Today Soluna lives in Copenhagen, one of the many places she considers home. When you have lived this many places, travelling and performing all over Europe and the world, you get a special relationship to people, cities and countries. A way of living which has taught Soluna a lot throughout the years and which she values highly in her life. This background is the reason that she masters 5 languages. She feels like a world citizen.

When Soluna sings her own songs you can tell that she has something on her mind. But this is also the case when she sings and interprets songs by other composers. She makes the songs relevant and sings them as if they where her own. When they first met Soluna, Isam B, Chief 1 and Remée were so moved by her voice and her personality, that there was no question that she was the right singer to perform their song in the Danish Melodi Grand Prix. Remée and Chief 1 (creators of the record label REACH) have, as individual artists, producers and songwriters achieved many successes. They are responsible for well over 30 million worldwide record sales. Among other achievements one can mention the prestigious ‘Ivor Novello’ award for one of the most played songs in the United Kingdom in 10 years being Jamelia’s Superstar.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_FgSMs79sM0

Moroccan Isam B is the well-known front man in the Danish hip-hop group ‘Outlandish’. They have a huge hit with the song Aicha topping the charts in several countries such as Denmark, Germany, The Netherlands, Sweden and Norway. Should’ve Known Better could easily have been written about Soluna’s own life and that makes it easy for her to personify the meaning of the song. “The song is very beautiful and it touches people when they hear it” Soluna explains. “I am looking forward to singing the song on the big stage in Baku in May, where my grandparents in Switzerland and Germany will have the opportunity to watch and vote for me”. When Soluna goes on stage in Baku it will be an international performance. Her band consists of musicians of different nationalities, which makes sense as it brings the vibe she feels as a world citizen.

Soluna Samay is a true musician; she is versatile in her music and in her visual expression. It is exactly this diversity that makes her very present and loveable. She understands how to reach out to an audience whether it is on the street or in front of thousands of TV viewers. She has a gift like very few, she makes people stop and listen, allowing themselves to be consumed in her universe. In Spanish sun is “Sol” and moon is “Luna” and in-between is the star, Soluna.

The Critics Voice Their Opinion

Jan Van Dijck 

  • A strong pop song, well performed by Soluna. Although the song’s ambience brings me back to the 2010 Swedish Eurovision entry “This is my life” performed by Anna Bergendahl. This song deserves to be in the Grand Final! and hence I will give it a total of eight (8) points from my side of the scoreline. 

Knut-Oyvind Hagen

  • Denmark’s song and singer this year is as sweet as the country itself. A song of the kind that deserves a life outside Eurovision, as it is pleasant for radio and for all ages. However, for me this isn’t a Eurovision winner, I don’t want it to win the whole competition, and I’m surprised that it is number 3 on the betting charts. But good luck, lovely neighbour!

Pitchtunes

  • A great song with good lyrics and melody. Soluna Samay is credible as an artist and performs it with such an outstanding expression, communicating the songs true message. You can’t stop listening to this song, it's a given favourite. Nine (9) points is the amount we have decided to award this entry.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6nR9nsKTx4g

Entry Background

Performer: Soluna Samay

Composers: Chief 1 & Remee

Authors: Chief 1, Remee & Isam B

Song: Should've Known Better

Language: English

Broadcaster: DR

History of the Nation

Denmark first took part in the Eurovision Song Contest in 1957, meaning the year following the creation of the esteemed competition and by virtue of finishing in third place, they seemed to set up a positive set of years ahead of them. Their first victory would ultimately come in 1963 thanks to the duet between Grethe and Jørgen Ingmann with the song Dansevise but would ultimately have to wait until 2000 for another victory which would be achieved by the Olsen Brothers and their track Fly On The Wings of Love. Since the millennium, the nation has been quite successful finishing in the top ten a total of five times including two consecutive top five finishes in 2010 thanks to Chanée and N'evergreen and the song In a Moment Like This as well as in 2011 when A Friend In London performed the track New Tomorrow.

Source: Eurovision.tv for the Biographical Information and all respective media

Published in Editorials
Friday, 14 May 2010 05:12

A Little Nordisk Melodi

For the past few years the Nordic countries have consistently worked hard to provide Eurovision with a winning candidate.  Sweden, first of all annually holds one of the most extensive and long running national finals, rivalled closely by Malta. Sweden also has one of the most impressive Eurovision track records as since their last win in 1999 Sweden has managed to qualify for a place in the final even after the introduction of the Semi Finals in 2004.

This makes them one of a handful of countries whom have managed to have a place in the final every year for the past decade.  Melodifestivalen 2010 was no exception, some of Sweden’s most loved and famous artists once again banded together for the chance to represent Sweden in Oslo. There were no outright winners or early predictions in the competition; there were of course popular songs and some good songs managing to qualify from the second chance round.  This year 18 year Anna Bergendahl won the competition by coming second in the jury vote but winning the public securing her win. The song is a charming ballad with few or no gimmicks; she has a nice voice and performs well. She lacks the stage presence her predecessors bought to the competition however; it is refreshing to have some fresh talent brought from Sweden.

Norway has had a mixed  history in Eurovision, still holding the highest number 0 points scores in the history of the competition.  The past two years have seen this reversed in 2009 Maria Haukaas Storeng managed to secured a 5th place in Belgrade before producing one of the most talked about ever Eurovision entries and winner. Alexander Rybak ratkked the Eurovision record book in Moscow and gives Norway one of the most peculiar records in the competition as they now have the records for the highest number of low scores and now the highest score ever. This year 21 year old Didrik Solli-Tangen is singing his ballad “My Heart is Yours” which beat early favourite boy band A1 to the right to represent the host country. Didrik’s ballad is very emotional but is reminiscent of a typical Westlife song. However, Didrik bravely performs it by himself and the home entry really isn’t one that is unpleasant on the ears. I wouldn’t assume it to be a winner, but this one will be picking up votes from right across the board.

Denmark has now become the less successful country from the Scandinavian peninsula over the past two years. In spite of qualifying for the final in 2008 & 2009  they have failed to neither make the top 10 nor really leave any lasting impression on the stage. Arguably similar for Sweden however Denmark’s acts lacked any real strong charisma or originality. Anyway, Denmark will be represented by Chanee and N’evergreen in Oslo this year and although the performance had a few cheesy elements the singer sing excellently live, which is not a bad thing at Eurovision. Their song “In a moment like this” is a power ballad sang as duet. The song was sung flawlessly a number of times in Melodi Grand Prix 2010 and I am sure they will have had time to perfect their onstage performance and as much as I would love for this to win, I do fear that some of the other songs will over shadow this.

Iceland has had a terrible few years not at Eurovision just in general terms, through economic collapse and now sending half the worlds aviation into turmoil. Iceland has however sent some of the most remembered acts to Eurovision in recents years. In 2008 Eurobandið had started out with high hopes but ended disappointingly outside of the top 10 yet last year Yohanna equalled their best ever result finishing second, albeit miles behind Norway. For 2010, Iceland has sent Hera Björk with her song “Je ne sais quoi” an up-tempo entry with only the title being sung in French the remainder being sung in English. This is certainly an enjoyable one, but I doubt this will make a huge impact in the competition as there are a number of better songs.

Finally, Finland; who have had steady success since their win in 2006. This year however, they have decided  to send a rather unusual song. Kuunkuiskaajat  "Työlki ellää" is a little like a Nordic folk-like pop song. As it is sung in Finnish it is difficult to understand exactly what the song is actually about and the onstage performance is actually quite bizarre I just think this is a little too weird and Eurovision fans will not appreciate this. So, Once again the Nordic countries have tried to send decent or at least memorable songs. I am quite a fan of Denmark and Sweden followed closely by Norway, but this may not be what fans think.

Published in Editorials
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